Seattle’s Top Skateparks: Where To Shred In The Emerald City

seattle's top skateparks

When people mention Seattle it generally conjures images of the Space Needle, people throwing fish, Starbucks, and that museum that looks like a smashed guitar. Missing from those stereotypes is the strong skateboarding presence in the city.

Seattle may be the city of rain and Pikes Place Market, but it’s also home to tons of excellent skateparks, as well as a selection of great Seattle skate shops. And Seattle isn’t just for park skaters, there are prime longboarding spots located throughout the city as well.

All Together Skatepark

All Together Skatepark seattle

First on any skater’s list should be All Together Skatepark, or as most people refer to it, A-T-S. Located in Fremont, All Together Skatepark is Seattle’s only indoor skatepark. That’s a key feature in a town known for its wet weather.

The park is huge at 6,900 square feet and features a broad mix of street and transition skating. Whether you’re looking to session a ledge or stair set, or are looking to rip around some curvy features, All Together deserves a visit.

All Together’s schedule changes with the seasons, so it’s worth visiting their website to make sure there’s an open skate session going on when you’re available.

Also, if you want to get after it, All Together rents out the entire park to private parties so you don’t have to worry about anyone snaking your line. No matter the weather, if you and your friends find yourselves in Seattle with skateboards, All Together Skatepark is worth a visit.

Judkins Skatepark

On the other end of the spectrum from the dry and indoors A-T-S park is Judkins Skatepark. Judkins is an outdoor park, and during the wet season it features a swamp in the greenspace median within the skatepark.

Don’t let that fool you though, Judkins is a great park with a diverse range of features. Transition skaters will love the long flowing pool area rife with creative lines perfect for getting your surf carve and flow on.

More street-oriented skaters will appreciate the variety of ledges, stairs, rails, and banks littering the park. Get out to Judkins and session your favorite features until you’re too tired to skate any more.

Delridge Skatepark

Delridge Skatepark seattle
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Similar to Judkins, Delridge Skatepark is a big, open park with a wide variety of features. It has a more defined pool area than Judkins, as well as a scattering of rollers, humps, and other creative features connected with pumpable paths.

Delridge is a perfect park for skaters who love working to find long, creative lines that link multiple features. It’s a fun park to just flow around, trying new hits and features.

Marginal Way Skatepark

Marginal Way Skatepark originated as a DIY spot under the freeway in 2004. Since then it has grown and now covers a huge area with multiple pools, ramps, and spines, all perfect for transition skaters.

It’s still 100% skater built and supported, and it’s definitely worth a visit thanks to its unique history, culture, and location. If you do make it over to skate at Marginal Way, consider donating some time to help keep the area clean and awesome to skate.

Jefferson Skatepark

Jefferson Skatepark seattle

Seattle’s Jefferson Skatepark could be an archetype of good park design. It’s home to a huge amorphous pool area, full of flowing transitions, as well as a slew of creative street features and gaps.

It’s the sort of skate park where no matter how long you’ve been skating, or what you like to do on the board, there’s something for you. Cruise the pool or session a ledge, Jefferson Skatepark has something for everyone.

Burke Gilman Trail

Burke Gilman Trail seattle
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This one isn’t a skatepark but definitely worth mentioning for longboarders. With constant beautiful views no matter what direction you look, Seattle is the perfect spot for some longboard cruising.

The famous Burke Gilman Trail is great for a long distance push as it stretches from Golden Gardens Park on the Puget Sound to Bothell on the north end of Lake Washington.

You can enjoy the smooth and wide paved trail while soaking in views of the water, city skyline, and Mt. Rainier towering over everything.

Got your fill of carving through the city? Make your way down to Alki Beach in West Seattle and coast along the shore for some boardwalk vibes.

Final words

So the next time you visit Seattle, stash an extra skateboard deck in your luggage, tack an extra day or two to your trip, and visit some of Seattle’s skateparks.

From the indoor consistency of All Together Skatepark to the gritty DIY atmosphere of Marginal Way and stellar views on the Burke Gilman Trail, Seattle has something for every skateboarder. Just don’t forget to bring a rain jacket.

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Photo credits:
(1) Featured image: “Jefferson Park” (CC BY 2.0) by Seattle Parks & Recreation
(2) “delridge_skatepark_05” (CC BY 2.0) by Seattle Parks & Recreation
(3) “Burke-Gilman Trail” (CC BY 2.0) by Seattle Parks & Recreation

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